Fri. Dec 8th, 2023
    Automation in the Kitchen: From Turriano’s Robot to Nymble’s Cooking Assistant

    Robotic technology has come a long way since the days of Juanelo Turriano, an Italian clockmaker and inventor who created automata for the pleasure of the Holy Roman emperor, Charles V. Turriano’s wooden and iron robotic toys, including musicians, battling soldiers, and even a bread-fetching automaton, provided entertainment during meal times. Today, automation has made its way into the kitchen, revolutionizing food and drink preparation.

    From simple drink and snack dispensers to self-service barista machines, automation has become increasingly common. Start-ups like Artly and CafeX have robotic arms that theatrically manipulate cups, pour latte art, and serve coffee. Chowbotics created a self-service salad kiosk where fresh salad bowls were prepared on demand from pre-prepared ingredients. And there are even pizza robots that can prepare, cook, and package pizzas.

    London-based Moley Robotics takes automation to a new level with a fully robotic domestic kitchen. Users can instruct the robot to create a particular recipe, and its dexterous arms can operate standard appliances, select ingredients, and cook meals automatically. It even cleans up after itself. However, this high-tech kitchen comes at a price, with costs reaching hundreds of thousands of pounds.

    Hamburg’s GoodBytz offers a commercial robotic kitchen capable of simultaneously preparing multiple meals. Its storage, cooking, and serving modules work together to plate and garnish each serving. With the capacity to prepare up to 3,000 meals a day, this robotic kitchen is a game-changer for the food service industry.

    The future of automation in the kitchen holds even more possibilities. Cambridge University and Beko are experimenting with sensors on robotic arms that can “taste” food. IBM Research Labs has developed an e-tongue prototype that can distinguish drinks by their chemical composition. And OlfaGuard is working on an e-nose to detect pathogens in food processors and kitchens.

    Looking ahead, the question arises: when will we have an automated, practical, and affordable chef in our homes? Nymble, a Bengaluru-based company, aims to make automated cooking accessible to households with its upcoming cooking robot. Users can load up to four ingredients, and the robot will cook and stir while monitoring consistency and temperature. With a wide range of recipes and the ability to develop and share new ones, Nymble is set to transform cooking at home.

    Automation in the kitchen has evolved significantly since Turriano’s time, and it continues to push boundaries, making cooking easier and more convenient for people around the world.

    FAQ

    What is automation in the kitchen?

    Automation in the kitchen refers to the use of robotics and technology to perform various tasks related to food and drink preparation, such as cooking, serving, and cleaning.

    What are some examples of kitchen automation?

    Examples of kitchen automation include self-service drink and snack dispensers, robotic barista machines, salad kiosks that mix ingredients on demand, pizza-making robots, and fully robotic domestic kitchens.

    How is automation in the kitchen transforming the food service industry?

    Automation in the kitchen is streamlining food preparation processes in the food service industry, increasing efficiency, reducing errors, and enabling the production of a large volume of meals. Robotic kitchens can simultaneously prepare multiple meals, plate and garnish each serving, and significantly reduce manual labor.

    What are some future developments in kitchen automation?

    Future developments in kitchen automation include robotic arms equipped with sensors to “taste” food, technology that can distinguish drinks by their chemical composition, and the development of electronic noses to detect pathogens in food processors and kitchens. The goal is to have practical and affordable automated chefs in domestic kitchens.

    (Source: [domain.com](domain.com))